A galactic bubble with a large surprise

Nestled within the shell around this large bubble is an embryonic star that is already a hefty eight times more massive than our Sun. The Galactic bubble is about 4,300 light-years away and has been blown by a star at its centre. The star is not visible at these infrared wavelengths but pushes on the surrounding dust and gas with nothing more than the power of its starlight.
The pressure exerted on the surrounding material is such that it has begun collapsing into new stars. The bright knot to the right of the base of the bubble is an unexpectedly large, embryonic star, revealed to Herschel’s infrared detectors by heating up the surrounding dense clumps of gas and dust.
Herschel’s observations have shown that it already contains at least eight times the mass of our Sun, and that it is still surrounded by an additional 2000 solar masses of gas and dust from which it can feed further.
Not all of the material will fall onto the star, however, as some will be blasted away by the intense radiation emitted by the star. Some stars reach an impressive 150 solar masses, but just how large this stellar embryo will grow remains to be seen.

Image credit: ESA/PACS/SPIRE/HOBYS Consortia

A galactic bubble with a large surprise

Nestled within the shell around this large bubble is an embryonic star that is already a hefty eight times more massive than our Sun. The Galactic bubble is about 4,300 light-years away and has been blown by a star at its centre. The star is not visible at these infrared wavelengths but pushes on the surrounding dust and gas with nothing more than the power of its starlight.

The pressure exerted on the surrounding material is such that it has begun collapsing into new stars. The bright knot to the right of the base of the bubble is an unexpectedly large, embryonic star, revealed to Herschel’s infrared detectors by heating up the surrounding dense clumps of gas and dust.

Herschel’s observations have shown that it already contains at least eight times the mass of our Sun, and that it is still surrounded by an additional 2000 solar masses of gas and dust from which it can feed further.

Not all of the material will fall onto the star, however, as some will be blasted away by the intense radiation emitted by the star. Some stars reach an impressive 150 solar masses, but just how large this stellar embryo will grow remains to be seen.

Image credit: ESA/PACS/SPIRE/HOBYS Consortia

(Source: esa.int)

  1. alramech reblogged this from distant-traveller
  2. sunanooshiro reblogged this from distant-traveller
  3. kiwininjasuperspy reblogged this from distant-traveller
  4. its-insignificant reblogged this from deuxkilometres
  5. kaidanrose reblogged this from distant-traveller
  6. deepspaceobjects reblogged this from starstuffblog
  7. redcodex reblogged this from distant-traveller
  8. nicestpersonalive reblogged this from distant-traveller
  9. starstuffblog reblogged this from distant-traveller
  10. suspicious-maddie reblogged this from distant-traveller
  11. 3ambox reblogged this from distant-traveller
  12. travelingtroublemaker reblogged this from sojourneraletheion
  13. where-the-dangerous-things-are reblogged this from distant-traveller
  14. sojourneraletheion reblogged this from distant-traveller
  15. judassod13 reblogged this from distant-traveller
  16. organicmachinery reblogged this from distant-traveller
  17. l30nrock reblogged this from distant-traveller
  18. circuitdesign reblogged this from distant-traveller
  19. bigbenalpha reblogged this from quantum-immortal
  20. pomegranatesandblackberries reblogged this from distant-traveller
  21. quantum-immortal reblogged this from distant-traveller
  22. classicallyforbiddenregions reblogged this from distant-traveller
  23. star-gazer5 reblogged this from distant-traveller
  24. xtetrodotoxinx reblogged this from distant-traveller

Theme NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY

Hit Counter