Carbon worlds may be waterless, finds NASA study

Planets rich in carbon, including so-called diamond planets, may lack oceans, according to NASA-funded theoretical research. Our sun is a carbon-poor star, and as result, our planet Earth is made up largely of silicates, not carbon. Stars with much more carbon than the sun, on the other hand, are predicted to make planets chock full of carbon, and perhaps even layers of diamond.
By modeling the ingredients in these carbon-based planetary systems, the scientists determined they lack icy water reservoirs thought to supply planets with oceans.
The building blocks that went into making our oceans are the icy asteroids and comets. If we keep track of these building blocks, we find that planets around carbon-rich stars come up dry. The team says that the extra carbon in developing star systems would snag the oxygen, preventing it from forming water. 
"It’s ironic that if carbon, the main element of life, becomes too abundant, it will steal away the oxygen that would have made water, the solvent essential to life as we know it," said Jonathan Lunine of Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., a collaborator on the research.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Carbon worlds may be waterless, finds NASA study

Planets rich in carbon, including so-called diamond planets, may lack oceans, according to NASA-funded theoretical research. Our sun is a carbon-poor star, and as result, our planet Earth is made up largely of silicates, not carbon. Stars with much more carbon than the sun, on the other hand, are predicted to make planets chock full of carbon, and perhaps even layers of diamond.

By modeling the ingredients in these carbon-based planetary systems, the scientists determined they lack icy water reservoirs thought to supply planets with oceans.

The building blocks that went into making our oceans are the icy asteroids and comets. If we keep track of these building blocks, we find that planets around carbon-rich stars come up dry. The team says that the extra carbon in developing star systems would snag the oxygen, preventing it from forming water. 

"It’s ironic that if carbon, the main element of life, becomes too abundant, it will steal away the oxygen that would have made water, the solvent essential to life as we know it," said Jonathan Lunine of Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., a collaborator on the research.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

(Source: jpl.nasa.gov)

  1. felicialearnsthings reblogged this from distant-traveller
  2. togob95 reblogged this from mucholderthen
  3. classicallyforbiddenregions reblogged this from secretporcupine
  4. secretporcupine reblogged this from shychemist
  5. deemmyspiritfled reblogged this from anomaly1
  6. 19529133824938 reblogged this from mucholderthen
  7. damnnjaz reblogged this from saturnsorbit
  8. the-redsunflower reblogged this from sumquaesum
  9. sumquaesum reblogged this from saturnsorbit
  10. anomaly1 reblogged this from saturnsorbit
  11. frderickchilton reblogged this from mucholderthen
  12. emotionalcompromise reblogged this from mucholderthen
  13. nyctophilia-until-morning reblogged this from mucholderthen
  14. rad-design reblogged this from mucholderthen
  15. erdae reblogged this from mucholderthen
  16. kilograhm reblogged this from mucholderthen
  17. scienceneversucksmsw reblogged this from mucholderthen
  18. mucholderthen reblogged this from distant-traveller and added:
    [ NASA via distant-traveller ] Carbon worlds may be waterless, finds NASA study Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
  19. a-kent reblogged this from distant-traveller
  20. spookyspinozason reblogged this from thecraftychemist
  21. luthienlefay reblogged this from simultaneities
  22. simultaneities reblogged this from distant-traveller
  23. fuyunoneko reblogged this from shychemist

Theme NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY

Hit Counter